New Weekly Creepypasta!

It’s that time again, here is a story I wrote and narrated myself.  Hope you enjoy!

A Note About “Crystal Moon”

Goodreads is an interesting Social Media platform.  It is surprisingly large considering it is only for readers.  As a reader I never found it useful.  I don’t understand the point in announcing to the world what I’m reading and how long it took me to read something.  I talk about what I’m reading with the people I know and that’s pretty much it.  Occasionally I will review something on Goodreads or mark a book “to-read.” As an author, Goodreads is essential for good or ill.  Generally, I find the platform from a writer’s perspective to be bitter-sweet.  Particularly the review system is bare-bones.  Unlike Amazon, Goodreads allows people to put a star rating without a written review.  Based on the ratings “Crystal Moon” has received on Goodreads, I get the sense that it is misunderstood.  However, without feedback that is conjecture.

“Crystal Moon” is an experimental book, it started with a fun idea that a man was a huge Star Wars fan who became paranoid and convinced his wife was a Dark Lady of the Sith.  When I started writing the story I changed the main character’s paranoia about his wife being a Sith to being a witch.  The novel was intended to be a quirky, dark comedy for a niche audience.  It is, an experiment.  It has thriller elements mixed with dark comedy in an Urban Fantasy with a message about the breakdown of communication in marriage. These factors on top of the book being written in journal format make it for a unique audience.  It was something I had fun with and I invite the reader to have fun too by not taking the book too seriously.

So, what does this have to do with Goodreads?  On the social media site, I’ve been getting lukewarm to disappointing ratings.  Frankly, it isn’t surprising due to the reasons I listed above, but here is the catch I do not get feedback from the people who rate the book on Goodreads.  Honestly, if you hate it, think my book is poorly written, or there is a glaring plot-hole I missed, I want to know.  The same goes for positive reviews too.  Do you like a book?  Are you going to take the time to rate it?  Follow through with a written review.  My beta-readers gave valuable feedback on “Crystal Moon” and generally it was positive with some critiques.  The irony of this is that “Crystal Moon” is selling decently well despite these ratings.  Maybe my targeting is off with the book, maybe people are turned off by the quirky plot or the journal format.  If I do not get feedback I do not know.

Another possibility is that people are rating “Crystal Moon” without reading it because it comes up on their “suggested reading” list.  Who knows, but while I stand by my book, I do acknowledge it isn’t for everyone, and that it isn’t above criticism.  So please, feel free to read it and write a review.  It doesn’t have to be glowing, all I ask is that it is thoughtful and constructive.  If you enjoy a fun and quirky light read that has heart but doesn’t take itself seriously, take a look at “Crystal Moon” on Amazon here.

Hope in Fiction

Note: This is a companion article to Cynical Fiction.

Why do people read or watch fiction?  Entertainment is the short and easy answer, but there is undoubtedly more.  After all, we can be entertained by non-fiction as well.  Fiction, particularly speculative fiction is a window into the possible.

Fiction shows us what happens if we allow evil to take control, it also offers shows the potential of the human spirit and hope.  Hope for what we can be, what our would and culture can become is the importance of fiction.  Ideally, fiction and stories will show us what we need to learn so that we do not fall into tragedy and oppression ourselves.  However, that is not always how it works.  For it is no secret that humanity has a great capacity for evil.  That doesn’t mean that some people do not pay attention.  After all, how many fictional stories written in the past are becoming increasingly plausible every day?

Through stories we teach and learn, ponder what it means to be good, evil, and human.  This is the point of fiction.  Therefore, hope is necessary in stories, even those that lack a particularly “good” ending, there must be meaning.  Otherwise, what is the point? Anything can accomplish the simple task of “entertaining” an audience, but meaning, hope, and truth is where true art is found in stories.  That is my goal as an author.  That is the sort of fiction that becomes timeless, yet these are the stories that are becoming less common and less popular.  We shouldn’t let cynicism and hopeless fiction become the new normal.