Why Read Goandria?

With hundreds of Fantasy books out there, why should anyone read Goandria: The Schism? As a fan of fantasy I set out on a mission to deliver something different. Of course that is every author’s goal. Goandria offers rich characterization and the characters are the driving force of the story. Many times I read fantasy stories and became fascinated by the world presented to me, but found the characters to be flat or characters of real races or religions.

I believe that speculative fiction can be a way to address hard issues without beating the audience over the head with them. Fantasy and Science Fiction can explore areas such as politics and ask hard questions about related topics. Of course this means doing it right. An author should never push an agenda onto his or her readers. Addressing sensitive topics in fiction properly involves more of a “what if” scenario such as: What if this idea was right all along? In Goandria, I like to do this through challenging my characters’ presuppositions. Many times fantasy has obvious caricatures of real world religions or political groups, and whether I agree or disagree with what the author is saying, I find such methods distasteful.

Goandria: The Schism is also just the beginning. It is a small window into a much larger world that will be slowly revealed with each new book. It is fantasy written for those who love to get lost in a new world and want something different.


A creature advances towards his prey, his sharp, black claws dripping with poison. The man and woman stare up, wide-eyed, as it advances upon them, knowing there is no way out. Their fate is sealed.

Such a scene invokes the imagination, and the human imagination is where fantasy thrives. One of the greatest things about fantasy is that literally anything is possible within the established parameters of the world presented. Most often, fantasy has beings such as elves, dwarves, and dragons, and there can be a plethora of varieties within each race. Even with things that do exist, fantasy has a way of changing and stretching them to fit into any world. Sometimes, the wide variety of peoples, races, and creatures that can be explored is overwhelming. How does a writer incorporate something as common as werewolves, ghosts, or vampires in a unique way? Do they even need to be unique to be effective? Sometimes good, old-fashioned, classical creatures are what a story needs. In Goandria, I try to be as unique as possible, but at the same time I like familiarity.

For example, in the upcoming novel series, the main foot soldiers are a dirty and ugly people, but I have grown weary of orcs being the staple for servants of a dark lord. The soldiers I refer to from Goandria are called thworfs, and they were originally inspired by orcs and other similar creatures, but as time went by, I tried to make them their own race. Orcs in fantasy are typically featured as belligerent and ugly, only capable of getting along on the battlefield. The thworfs may be unattractive by human standards, but other than that, I tried to abandon other similarities. I wanted to explore a race that was coerced but that was also not entirely what they seem to be.

On the other hand, I choose not to tamper too much with dragons. Dragons are perhaps the staple of fantasy. Nearly every form of the genre has its own take on the famous lizard breed. Personally, I like the animalistic dragons that are all about power and terror. There are just some elements of fantasy that do not need a whole lot of tinkering to be effective. Ultimately, uniqueness is difficult to find, and I believe presenting creatures that are believable within the framework of the world is most important. There are occasions in which a typical werewolf is what a story needs. The challenge for the writer is to find what that need is. More often than not, uniqueness is good, and that is generally my goal with Goandria.

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Avoiding Clichés

Clichés in fantasy are many, and in previous blog posts, I have addressed a few that I try to avoid.  As an author it can be dangerous to make the claim that I am avoiding clichés when they can be hard to avoid.  I would imagine that many times when authors use clichés in their works it is unintentional, or perhaps I would just like to give my fellow writers the benefit of the doubt.  Especially if the writer has a traditional publishing contract, I would guess if the author included clichés it is intentional.  What cliché have I not addressed before that is replete in fantasy books, TV shows, and films?  The one magical weapon that can destroy the dark lord.

I have seen this cliché repeated in various fantasy stories.  There is the One Ring in The Lord of the Rings, the Sword of Shannara in the Shannara series, and Harry Potter is the only one in the whole world who can defeat Voldemort.  In that sense, Harry Potter is the magical object that can destroy the villain.  It is a neat concept and is believable within the context of a nearly all-powerful villain.  If a writer sets up an immortal, super-powerful antagonist, it is very difficult to defeat him or her in a believable way.  However, does this have to be the case for so many villains in fantasy?  This cliché is also one of the many common complaints I have found with post-Tolkien fantasy.  What if fantasy started to regularly employ other means of defeating the main villain?  What if modern fantasy could rise above the common problems that make it look a lot like clones of the Middle-Earth Legendarium?  What if the antagonist destroyed himself?  What if the protagonist found an unconventional chink in the villain’s metaphorical armor?

What I want to see is new life breathed into the fantasy genre.

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Goandria: A world set apart

One of my favorite ways speculative fiction is portrayed is when the setting is a completely different world and environment. I like to see stories take place in worlds other than Earth. I understand the purpose of placing fictional stories in our home world, but for me to truly get immersed in the experience, I like it to be somewhere new. From my perspective, it seems that science fiction works much better on Earth than fantasy does.

Once again, I will use Tolkein’s mythology as an example. He paints a beautiful picture of Middle-Earth, filled with races and creatures completely different than we would encounter in everyday life. Yet the stories of Middle-Earth are supposed to be a fictional history of the Earth we know today. It is an intriguing idea, but there is a part of me that is disappointed. I feel that placing a magical world within our own ruins the mystery. Of course not all share my view and this is just a personal preference. However, when I set out to write my own stuff I decided it would not take place on Earth, nor will it be an alternate dimension. I made Goandria to be its own world. The best part of speculative fiction for me is the speculative part.

With making something entirely different with Goandria, I feel I have the freedom to be more fluid with the world. There is medieval technology in Goandria, but I mix in modern dialogue to show that Goandria does not necessarily follow the same developmental history as our own world. With Goandria I aim to take the reader on a journey that I would enjoy to go on. One where everything is new, yet there is a sense of familiarity that coincides with it.

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